What is a Default Judgment?

Have you ever heard of a default judgment? Have you ever had a default judgment entered against you?

The Nebraska Supreme Court rules define default judgments as “cases where the defendant fails to answer, demur, or otherwise plead,” and the plaintiff files a verified petition, affidavits, or sworn testimony on the day after the defendant’s answer was supposed to be filed. Rule 6-1432.

OK, so this is a Netflix envelope. The point is: don't ignore anything you get in the mail. Whether it's your next Netflix dvd or a notice that you're being sued.

OK, so this is a Netflix envelope. The point is: don’t ignore anything you get in the mail. Whether it’s your next Netflix dvd or a notice that you’re being sued.

Cutting through the legalese, here’s what this means:

You get a notice in the mail that you are being sued. Instead of doing something (ANYTHING!), you ignore the notice and hope it goes away. It doesn’t go away. 30 days pass from the day you were served with the lawsuit notice. 

On the 31st day of knowing you are being sued, the plaintiff files all the important paperwork with the court that they think will sufficiently prove their case against you, the defendant. 

There’s a default judgment hearing before the judge. Plaintiff assumes you won’t be there, since you didn’t answer the lawsuit complaint in the first place, and let’s face it, you probably won’t be there. So the judge and the plaintiff’s attorney and maybe even the plaintiff himself is there, at the hearing. You’re not there. No one hears your side of the story because you weren’t there to tell it and you didn’t think it was important to answer the lawsuit complaint in the first place. 

Having heard only one side – the plaintiff’s side of things – the judge will enter a default judgment against you. Not good, not good at all. Now the plaintiff can go about finding ways to get his default judgment paid – by garnishing your wages, garnishing your bank account, searching for pockets of money you might have to pay off the judgment, which is a higher amount than your original debt that went into collections. 

Unfortunately, this is why debt collectors have so much leverage over the average consumer – no one thinks it’s important to respond when they receive notice that they are being sued. Who cares if it’s only for that medical debt that you can’t pay anyway?? I care, because if you allow a default judgment to be entered against you, additional fees, interest, and costs will be tacked onto your original debt. Do you think you should be paying more money on the debt you already can’t pay?

Bottomline: please please please don’t ignore those lawsuit notices. Answer them, show up to your hearing dates, or do whatever you need to do to keep yourself in the game.

 

 

What Debt Collectors Can’t Do….#1

I’m starting a series, hopefully to help those of you receiving calls from debt collectors, or other types of communications from debt collectors (Ex: my post on The Worst Thing a Debt Collector can Do to You).

To start the series, let’s talk about one violation that seems to occur with alarming regularity:

Causing the phone to ring or engaging any person in telephone conversations repeatedly

This language is taken directly from the federal statute, 15 U.S.C. 1692(d)(5), outlining one of many forms of harassment a debt collector may not use in order to collect a debt. Here’s the full text of 1692(d)(5):

“Causing a telephone to ring or engaging any person in telephone conversation repeatedly or continuously with intent to annoy, abuse, or harass any person at the called number.”

So how many telephone calls does it take to count as harassment? It depends.

Frustrating answer, isn’t it? There isn’t a bright line rule because courts analyze the statute under a case-by-case basis. This means the facts of one case don’t necessarily predict the outcome of another case that might have similar, but distinguishable facts.

Here are some factors to consider if a debt collector has been calling you:

  • How many calls have been made to your home or office or cell phone?
  • Over what length of time have those calls been made? Common sense would suggest that the more calls made over a short course of time, the more likely it is that you have a violation.
  • Are they leaving messages if you don’t pick up the call?
  • Are you picking up the call every time they call?
  • Are they calling after working hours?

Bottomline: if you feel as though a debt collector is harassing you with their constant phone calls, contact a FDCPA attorney to see what they think.